New homes for sale between Midhurst and Haslemere 

  • Winners of 2017 Sussex Heritage Trust Award for Best Landscape & Gardens
  • Winners of 2016 WhatHouse? Awards for Best Renovation
  • Winners of 2016 Sussex Heritage Trust Award for Best Large Scale Residential Development
  • Winners of 2016 Evening Standard Award for Best Conversion and Best out of London Home
  • Winners of 2015 WhatHouse? Awards for Best Renovation and Best Partnership Scheme

King Edward VII Estate sits within the South Downs National Park (an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty) in West Sussex, between Haslemere and Midhurst. It comprises a unique mix of Grade II and II* Listed buildings which have been meticulously restored and converted into exceptional apartments, duplexes and houses combining all the original character features of the existing buildings with stylish modern specifications.

In addition to the private homes at King Edward VII Estate there are also a collection of fantastic communal areas and facilities including a private gym, concierge service, landscaped gardens, and a boutique lounge where residents can enjoy a cup of tea or coffee from the servery. With Planning Permission approved, residents will also soon be able to enjoy a range of leisure facilities located within the historic former Chapel, including a swimming pool and café* and there are also long-term plans for a tennis court.

These extensive internal communal spaces mean home owners can cost effectively own their own piece of history with all the space and luxuries normally associated with a much larger home.

The gardens, originally planted by the acclaimed horticulturalist Gertrude Jekyll, have been replanted and are once again coming to life for all residents to enjoy.

*Café subject to stage of development and suitable provider.

New Build Availability

Conversion Availability

  • King Edward VII Estate

    King Edward VII Estate sits within the South Downs National Park (an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty) in West Sussex, between Haslemere and Midhurst. It comprises a unique mix of Grade II and II*...

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Interior Design

  • General

    The contemporary interiors are created using a palette of pastel colours which blend perfectly with the historic features of the properties. Each home has been cleverly designed to maximise space and...

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    Kitchens

    Bespoke luxurious kitchens, in a variety of finishes, have been carefully designed to suit the unique layout of each property. All are fitted with stone worktops and stainless steel appliances from...

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  • Bathrooms

    Spa style sanctuary bathrooms are both modern and understated, featuring soft colours providing clean and luxurious finishes. All bathrooms enjoy quality branded items such as Sanitaryware from Vitra...

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Facilities

  • Leisure

    When you live at King Edward VII Estate you can enjoy a host of excellent leisure facilities. The Estate boasts a gym offering workout and resistance equipment and beautifully restored communal spaces...

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  • Landscaping

    The elegant gardens of the King Edward VII Hospital were designed by the highly acclaimed garden designer, Gertrude Jekyll. She worked closely with Percy Adams to allow the integration of the...

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  • Management Company

    The Managing Agent, Encore, provides services relating to the day-to-day running of King Edward VII Estate, for the Management Company. The Managaing Agent and the on-site concierge ensure that...

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Local Area

Local Area

King Edward VII Estate sits within the South Downs National Park (an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty) on the West Sussex/Surrey border.

It is a short distance from the A3 corridor and combines all the benefits of rural living with easy access to the M25 and major London airports including Heathrow and Gatwick and excellent commuter train links in to London Waterloo from Haslemere Station in less than an hour.

The small market town of Midhurst is located five miles away, offering a range of restaurants, shops and other local amenities. Midhurst has recently just been named one of the best places to live within the UK.

Haslemere, just 7 miles away, offers a range of boutique shops and independent restaurants and cafes, as well as a bakery, deli and fishmonger. There are also several pubs and restaurants as well as small boutique shops, well-known high street brands and supermarkets.

Further afield the cathedral city of Chichester offers a wide range of high-street brands and restaurants and can be reached in 45 minutes by car.

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Lifestyle

Plans for the estate include an on-site swimming pool and gym for the private use of residents and a series of public walks totalling 6.9km meandering around the estate through mature oak woodlands and heathlands.

Residents will also have access to some of the original hospital communal areas, including the Lounge and Reading Rooms.

In addition to this the magnificent Arts & Crafts style Chapel, with views over the grounds, will be occupied as a community shop/café offering residents easy access to basic supplies and a wonderful space to socialise.

In the local area are numerous restaurants, including the award winning Duke of Cumberland, Lythe Hill and Spread Eagle Hotels to mention a few. Whilst Haslemere and Midhurst offer a range of high street and small independent shops.

For the more active amongst residents, aside from the beautiful ambling countryside ideal for trekking and biking, are a wide range of activities including the Cowdray Park Golf and Polo Clubs, the Haslemere Lawn Tennis Club and a number of swimming and fitness centres.

For those with an interest in yachting and sailing the Chichester Yacht Club is an all year round members club whilst the Chichester Cruiser Racing Club races in Hayling Bay, the Solent and beyond.

If you are looking to relax the Spread Eagle Hotel and Spa, Old Thorns Manor Hotel Golf & Country Estate and Champneys Forest Mere are a short drive from the estate.

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History

Impressed by a tuberculosis sanatorium he visited while touring Germany, in 1901 King Edward VII decided to found one similar in England. The site chosen was on a bright, south facing hillside near Midhurst with open views to the South Downs.

  • 1901

    The King’s Sanatorium” was founded in 1901 to care for those suffering from tuberculosis and was officially opened on the 13th June 1906 by His Majesty King Edward VII, who gave assent for the institution to be called the King Edward VII Sanatorium. At the time when the sanatorium was designed it was heralded as a significant advancement in the treatment of the sick, where the importance of rest, relaxation, fresh air and light were incorporated into the buildings and surroundings as these were seen as equally important to the treatment of patients as the medical intervention. After the eradication of tuberculosis the sanatorium was transformed into a modern hospital admitting NHS and private patients with all types of illnesses. It also specialised in cancer care, cardiology and facial reconstruction.

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    KEVII Building

  • 1920

    The hospital was designed by Charles Holden and Percy Adams. Charles Holden went on to become a leading English architect who is best known for his designs in the 1920s and 1930s of London Underground stations. He was also a highly regarded figure in the architectural community, with Charles Rennie Macintosh being one of the key figures he is known to have influenced. The hospital was highly acclaimed in the architectural press when completed. It was said to be ‘one of the three finest of the time’ in the Royal Commission survey of English Hospitals: 1660 to 1948, and was highly praised by Pevsner. Charles Holden could have been Sir Charles Holden, but he turned down the offer.

    King Edwards VII Hopsital circ 1920 800x500

  • 1960

    Until the 1950’s the building faired well, with the necessary extensions being designed in a sensitive manner. However, from the 1960’s onwards such sensitivity was put aside, with the practicalities of a hospital being the overriding influence. These unfortunate additions paid little regard to the historic architecture and landscape. Despite this much of the historic fabric and quality remains, and the upgrading to Grade II* listing in 2004 for the main building and chapel underline the importance of this collection of historic buildings.

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  • 1964

    After 1964, the hospital was used for more general purposes. Over the years, many unsympathetic modern additions were made to the original Grade I I and I I* listed buildings. 

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  • 2006

    The hospital eventually closed in 2006. Thereafter, it lay abandoned and in decline.

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  • 2009

    In 2009 City & Country purchased the Estate.

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  • Today

    All unsightly interventions have been removed and the buildings meticulously restored to their former glory.

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King Edward VII Estate, Midhurst
Kings Drive
Midhurst
GU29 0BJ

Call 01730 81 79 79
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