1877 The Old Portsmouth Gaol

HELEN MOORE - MANAGING DIRECTOR

Having worked in the property development industry for 25 years, previously with Countryside Properties and Crest Nicholson, Helen was appointed as the first non-family Managing Director of City & Country in 2010. This experience with large housebuilders has made her value the creative, bespoke and sensitive approach adopted by City & Country across all its projects. Helen heads the Community Consultation process in order to encourage the active participation of key stakeholders and to ensure their thoughts and aspirations play a key role in shaping our vision.

SIMON VERNON-HARCOURT - PLANNING AND TECHNICAL DIRECTOR

Simon joined the group in 2007. He is a chartered architect with an excellent eye for design talent, and great technical knowledge of historic buildings, construction techniques and planning rules. Simon has achieved a series of successful planning consents for challenging projects.

RICHARD WINSBOROUGH - ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR (PLANNING)

As a chartered town planner and a member of the Royal Town Planning Institute, Richard has led our experienced in-house planning team since joining the group in 2011 having previously worked for large scale developers and run his own planning consultancy. Richard takes an active role in all the groups’ projects, working closely with the local authority, local community and consultees.

THE CONSULTANT TEAM

We recognise the importance of working with highly skilled consultants with values similar to our own. Following an extensive interview process we have selected a team we believe has the skill, experience and local knowledge that will make them ideal partners to help us realise an exciting new vision for this complex and challenging site.

Our lead consultants for this project are Feilden+Mawson (Architects) and LUC (Landscape Architects); both experienced consultants with an in-depth knowledge of working with sites of this scale and historical significance.

Feilden+Mawson has been working on historic and listed buildings for over 50 years. Sir Bernard Feilden, one of the founding partners wrote the book “The Conservation of Buildings” which remains a standard text, and the practice has developed many of the techniques for working on historic buildings which are commonplace today.

The practice was founded in 1956, and is led by the fourth generation of partners who share these guiding principles. It is an acknowledged leader in the adaptation and restoration of historic buildings and has established reputations for delivering buildings that are designed with care and skill. They seek to make buildings that will add meaning to our changing lives and place the experience of individuals; as occupants, visitors or just passers-by, at the heart of their work.

LUC has extensive experience in the research, restoration and management of historic landscapes and has undertaken many commissions for Heritage Property Specialists, National Trust, the Royal Parks, local authorities, private and corporate landowners. They have guided the conservation and future direction of landscapes such as Stowe, Wilton, Grey’s Court, open spaces within The Tower of London and all of the Royal Parks, including Regent’s Park, Kensington Gardens, Hyde Park, Richmond Park and Bushy Park. Large scale projects have also included the Eden Project.

  • 1800's

    Bristol General Hospital began life in 1832, housed in modest dwellings in Guinea Street between the Redcliffe and Bedminster Parishes. The new facilities were the initiative of a group of local Quakers who were appalled at the lack of health provision for the growing industrial poor of Bedminster and Redcliffe and in the early days only local residents were allowed access to treatment.

  • 1900's

    The original building began as two four-storey blocks joined by a central tower with one block facing Bathurst Basin and the other the New Cut. In 1873 the northern block was extended and in 1886 a new nurses home was wrapped around the corner to Guinea Street. The nurses home was subsequently extended again in 1907. These four phases largely represent the work of W.B Gingell, a local architect known for his elegant warehouses and churches, Henry Crisp, another local man, and his protégé, George Herbert Oatley, Bristol's most renowned architect and Knight. From 1915 Oatley buill t the Chapel and King Edward VII Wing, a tour de force in reinforced concrete.

  • Present Day

    The nurses home was subsequently extended again in 1907. These four phases largely represent the work of W.B Gingell, a local architect known for his elegant warehouses and churches, Henry Crisp, another local man, and his protégé, George Herbert Oatley, Bristol's most renowned architect and Knight. From 1915 Oatley built the Chapel and King Edward VII Wing, a tour de force in reinforced concrete.

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