Contemporary new homes for sale at The General.

The New Yard at The General offers a selection of contemporary one, two and three bedroom apartments, duplexes and houses in an enviable location only a short walk to the city centre and Bristol Temple Meads train station.

Discover your new home within this collection of four distinct buildings: Gingell House, Sugar House, Flour House or Lawrence House, each named to recognise an aspect of this important historic location

 

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  • The General

    The General

    The General, located in BS1 and just a short walk from the city centre and Bristol Temple Meads, offers stylish converted character homes within the original listed buildings. Many of the apartments...

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Interior Design

  • General

    All apartments have a fully inclusive specification with integrated kitchen appliances, stone worktops, master bedroom wardrobes, flooring throughout and tiling finishes. The premium interiors have...

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  • Kitchens

    This premium specification, from the stylish communal areas to each individual apartment, has been chosen to ensure every property benefits from the best of contemporary, well-considered...

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  • Bathrooms

    The New Yard residents enjoy modern bathrooms, which are both contemporary and understated. Featuring Sanitaryware by Laufen and Brassware from Crosswater. The full specification includes:

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Facilities

  • Communal Facilities

    The New Yard offers a peaceful and tranquil retreat from the busy city. The attractive courtyard with its beautifully restored water fountain and elegant landscaping provides an oasis for all...

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  • Management Company

    The management company at The New Yard provides services relating to the day-to-day running of the development. They ensure; alongside the on-site concierge, that all communal areas are kept clean and...

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Local Area

Local Area

The New Yard is located in a bustling waterfront location on the edge of the famous Bristol Floating Harbour. It is ideally located a short walk from Bristol city centre, Temple Meads Train Station, the financial districts of Temple Quay and Temple Back, and the University of Bristol.

While the central part of the city still operates water routes for both leisure and commuters on the harbour, excellent road and rail links have enabled fast connections to all major UK cities.  Bristol is also served by its own international airport location around eight miles from the city centre.  

The New Yard, on the south side of the River Avon, is in the heart of Redcliffe; an area with a growing reputation and vast regeneration plans which in the next five years will see it undertake a rapid diversification.

With a thriving restaurant and café scene, Bristol is also home to numerous independent bars and pubs, which helps to support a lively night life scene.

Bristol’s city centre streets are lined with restaurants, clubs, bars, museums, galleries as well as the floating harbour. Well known for the world class shopping on offer from established high street brands at Cabot’s Circus, the city is home to an eclectic range of boutiques and individual shops.

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Lifestyle

Being crowned the best city to live in in Britain by The Sunday Times, Bristol is no longer a hidden secret, and is welcoming a surge of professionals, who in turn are supporting a burgeoning employment market. Combining an eclectic blend of culture, style, and a fabulous social scene, Bristol exceeds the demands of 21st century living. As its popularity grows, so does demand for prime property and The New Yard promises to deliver a range of highly sought after city centre homes.

The New Yard’s central location offers easy access throughout the city centre, whilst it also forms the heart of a vibrant new community of its own on the harbourside. Residents at The New Yard will be on the doorstep of fashionable shopping, a wide range of entertainment venues, as well as a number of stylish eateries.  The cosmopolitan streets offer an array of chic boutique and designer outlets whilst the city is bursting with fantastic independently owned restaurants, bars and cafes.

Synonymous with the arts and creative industries, Bristol has a multifaceted cultural identity evidenced in historic venues such as The Theatre Royal, one of the oldest working theatres in the country and the presence of renowned street artist Banksy (many of whose works can be spotted on buildings throughout the city).  On one hand it serves as a fashionable and youthful university city, on the other it supports a thriving employment market, and somewhere in between it maintains its liberal roots with a plethora of quirky theatres, idiosyncratic bars and eccentric boutiques.

Home to the internationally renowned Bristol University and the popular University of the West of England, Bristol is home to over 45,000 students, who greatly contribute to the city’s youthful and sociable personality. Properties at The New Yard will exceed the demands of student living, whilst also offering a sage investment for parents who are looking to secure a residence for their son or daughter during their period of study and as an investment beyond that.

Uniting the central area on the south side of the River Avon, The New Yard is primed to deliver a significant number of properties that will offer a high degree of luxury at an affordable price. The range of apartments will particularly appeal to those considering downsizing from larger, family sized homes in the city’s ‘traditional’ residential hotspots. The New Yard’s grand period features mean a compromise does not have to be met between functionality and character, and the attraction of a secure, partially gated development within walking distance of all city centre attractions is obvious.

The New Yard is well positioned for commuters; Bristol Temple Meads is just a five minute walk and offers regular services. With plans to electrify the railway between London and Bristol by 2016, doubling the number of services and reducing travel time by twenty minutes, the city is an attractive proposition for those looking to commute into the capital.   

Bristol is rapidly emerging as a rival to Manchester and Birmingham in the fight to attract investors and professionals away from London. As the South West experiences a huge period of expansion, the opportunities for property investment within Bristol are growing. As the local economy continues to experience sustained growth, robust property prices coupled with a high quality lifestyle make the city an ideal area for investment.

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History

Bristol General Hospital began life in 1832, housed in modest dwellings in Guinea Street between the Redcliffe and Bedminster Parishes. The new facilities were the initiative of a group of local Quakers who were appalled at the lack of health provision for the growing industrial poor of Bedminster and Redcliffe and in the early days only local residents were allowed access to treatment.

  • 1830's

    The early 1830's were a time of great social change in most English cities and Bristol was no exception. Political unrest erupted with the Bristol Riots of 1831 where residents demanded the right to vote and the big health issue of the day was the containment of the deadly cholera epidemics. Both these issues were to influence, indirectly, the growth of the General Hospital.

    Gingell Engraving of Original Building c1853 800x500

  • 1858

    Bristol General Hospital first opened its doors on the site in 1858 making a grand statement with its Italianate stonework and French Renaissance rooftops. The new hospital cost £28,000, with much of the funding coming from local workers, who gave a penny a week towards building and running costs

  • 1873

    The original building began as two four-storey blocks joined by a central tower with one block facing Bathurst Basin and the other the New Cut. In 1873 the northern block was extended and in 1886 a new nurses’ home was wrapped around the corner to Guinea Street. The nurses’ home was subsequently extended again in 1907. These four phases largely represent the work of W.B Gingell, a local architect known for his elegant warehouses and churches, Henry Crisp, another local man, and his protégé, George Herbert Oatley, Bristol’s most renowned architect and Knight. From 1915 Oatley built the Chapel and King Edward VII Wing, a tour de force in reinforced concrete.

    Exterior 1907 heritage800x500

    1923 showing cast iron balconies800x500

  • 1900's

    During WWII the Hospital suffered severe bomb damage which all but destroyed the mansard roof and the structure over the octagonal tower in the south west corner of the building. The roof and top floor including that of the octagonal tower was subsequently removed and the building re-roofed with a flat roof. The 1916-1919 metal balconies were also removed owing to bomb damage.

    Following the addition of a nurses’ accommodation block to the east of the site in 1925, the final expansion took place in 1931 with the construction of the William Lloyd Unit on Commercial Road.

    1930s Addtion to Foreground800x500

    The remainder of the 20th century development of the site has been characterised by ad hoc accretions, infill and extensions which lacked any sense of vision or formal masterplan.

    IMG 5830 800x500

  • 2012

    The Bristol General Hospital finally closed its doors in 2012 when the planned South Bristol Community Hospital opened and the services were transferred. City & Country acquired the site in June 2012.

  • 2015
    First residents moved into their new homes
  • 2018
    The General, reinstated to its former glory after restoration works have been completed and sales The New Yard is released for sale. 

    The General After Restoration 800x500 

    ny history 800x500

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To:

The New Yard, Bristol
Lower Guinea Street
Bristol
BS1 6SX

Call 0117 321 1081
  • Sales suite open daily 10am to 5pm
  • Street parking on Guinea Street
  • Pay and Display parking at Mercure Holland House Hotel
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