The dome's home

GEN Exteriors Mar18 18 HR


The Historic Ogee Dome has been reinstated at The General, recreating an original feature from 1853.

The grade II-listed former hospital by Bathurst Basin has been restored to its 19th century with the completion of the historic Ogee Dome atop its octagonal tower.

City & Country has been restoring the historic Grade II listed former hospital back to its original exterior design of 1853, with the Ogee Dome as one of the key features of the restoration. 

This unique structure is in the oldest part of the building, but during World War II the hospital suffered severe fire damage following a direct hit from an incendiary device. The blitz damage all but destroyed the dome and due to budget constraints, it was never replaced. For years covered with a flat roof, it housed the building’s water tank. The replica dome has been installed restoring the property’s Victorian charm and silhouette.

The replica dome is 10 metres wide by 9.5 metres high and represented a huge design and engineering challenge. Weighing over 16 tonnes, over 20,000 nails and screws have been used to construct it in a project that required skilled craftspeople in short supply in today’s building industry.

City & Country subsequently partnered with its structural engineer. Hydrock, and the carpenters on-site to build the enormous dome, which had to be constructed off-site in individual panels due to its size with some sections weighing 780 kilograms.

The completed dome has eight dormer windows spread over two storeys. These feature prominently, as the octagonal tower beneath the dome is home to four apartments. The most impressive of these is split over three levels, boasting a panoramic viewing station in the top of the dome.

The dome is one of the latest features to be reinstated at The General. City & Country has already restored much of the former hospital including a replica mansard roof that was added to the building last year, replacing the original that was also lost to bomb during World War Two.

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